nickelLast week, Blue Buffalo filed an amended S-1 providing an expected price range for its sale of 29.5 million shares of common equity, with an overallotment allocation of 4.4 million shares.  The company expects to raise in excess of $500 million in its IPO and will trade under the ticker symbol BUFF.

Based on an expected valuation range of between $16-$18 per share, at the mid-point ($17/share) Blue Buffalo would have an equity value of approximately $3.3 billion and total enterprise value of over $3.5 billion based on net debt of $241 million as of the March 31, 2015. This would imply a valuation of just over 18x trailing twelve months Adjusted EBITDA (as defined by the company) as of March 31, 2015.  The above stated range fell below my expectations in terms of anticipated value.  A few factors are likely to be weighing on institutional investors’ minds in light of a more complete analysis of the company’s S-1.

  • Too many eggs in one basket.  Companies that are subject to customer concentration issues generally receive discounts in the capital and M&A markets. In the case of pet food the customers are the retailers.  As disclosed in the  S-1, 73% of Blue Buffalo’s sales were to national pet superstores, PetSmart and Petco.  Based on my personal analysis and those of third parties I consulted, collectively we estimated that PetSmart likely accounts for between 66% – 75% of Blue Buffalo’s national pet specialty volume. This would imply that PetSmart is responsible for approximately 50% of the company’s total sales volume. This puts Blue Buffalo is in a more complex position vis-a-vis a move to mass.  While we think such a move for Blue Buffalo is inevitable, it may complicate the process or drive up the cost.  Clearly, PetSmart and Blue Buffalo need each other, for now. That said, last week PetSmart announced, what many had already known, that Natural Balance would now be available throughout their store network and online properties. I view Natural Balance as a perfect comp for Blue Buffalo from a product positioning standpoint. If PetSmart is able to obtain access to Merrick it would add a second leg to that protective stool.
  • Share and share alike, not really. According to Blue Buffalo’s own market segmentation analysis, in 2014 it owned a 34% share of what it terms the “Wholesome Natural” segment, which it defines as dry dog food using only natural ingredients (based on AAFCO), that have whole meat or meat meals, with the animal protein type clearly identified as their principal ingredient.  These traits are distinguished from the “Engineered” segment, which are characterized by the fact they typically do not contain whole meal or meat meal as their principal ingredient and/or they use lower cost proteins (by-product meal, corn/wheat gluten) and contain lower-cost starches (corn, wheat, fractionated grains). Setting aside the current supply chain issues as it relates to Blue Buffalo’s self classification, this nuance allows Blue Buffalo to inflate its market share. While we can appreciate the desire to isolate one’s difference in terms of ingredient panel and adherence to certain standards, this segmentation allows Blue Buffalo to exclude a meaningful set of Brands/SKUs from their market share calculation, thereby overstating the company’s position.  Talk to a seasoned pet food merchandiser and they will tell you this is not how they, or their end customers, think about the market.  I also note that several of the of brands in the Wholesome Natural segmentation analysis are either overstated or understated based on what I know to be their 2014 sales.  This simply speaks to the imprecise nature of the analysis.
  • About that lawsuit. Blue Buffalo’s S-1 makes it clear that they are responsible for directing their suppliers to purchase the ingredients they approve, from the people they approve, based on the terms they themselves negotiate.  Yet somehow Blue seems to be getting a free ride as it relates to their recent sourcing issues. However, several people I have spoken to recently expressed greater conviction about the probability of a countersuit from Wilber Ellis and/or a Purina victory.  If Purina does in fact play this out and wins an injunction against Blue Buffalo as it relates to its ingredient claims, it would undermine the Blue Buffalo story, in addition to having meaningful financial implications.  I note that the company has not set up a litigation reserve due to the fact that the lawsuit is in the early stages (as self defined), it is unclear the damages the plaintiffs are seeking, and the fact that Blue Buffalo maintains its counter claims.  It seems quite reasonable that institutional investors are factoring potential losses into their valuation models.

Notwithstanding the issues above, we expect Blue Buffalo to have a successful IPO later this month and for it soon to be trading at an enterprise value in excess of $4 billion.  Even a modest first day pop would get the company there. Get your popcorn, this should be fun to watch.

/bryan

Note: This blog is for informational purposes only. The opinions expressed reflect my view as of the publishing date, which are subject to change.  While this post utilizes data sources I consider reliable, I cannot guarantee the accuracy of any third party cited herein.

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