October 2013


willieWillie Nelson once said, the early bird may get the worm, but the second mouse gets the cheese.  In this case, I’m not sure which mouse I was.  Just days after I published my fall pet report a number of news worthy items came into focus that would have merited a mention in my industry report.  However, several of the items provide direct validation of the trends I have been discussing here over the past year.

Of greatest significance was the headlines coming out of PetSmart’s Analyst Day presentation.  Just prior to their Analyst Day presentation on October 17th, management announced that they expected third quarter same-store-sales (“SSS”) comps to come in below the anticipated range. Management believes 3Q13 SSS will come in at 2.0% – 2.5% versus prior guidance of 3.0% – 4.0%. PetSmart has not seen comps this slow since 2009. Notwithstanding the company’s issues with driving traffic, management is sticking by its full year EPS guidance.

Notably, as part of their presentation, PetSmart finally addressed its web strategy in some detail.  CEO David Lenhardt noted that how to remain relevant to consumers across channels was one of his biggest concerns and that the company would be investing more of its marketing budget and CRM resources online. He went on to detail several new ecommerce initiatives include in-store inventory look-up online, improved mobile experience online, in-store pick-up, and opening of a new West Coast distribution center which will reduce shipping times. Lenhardt continues to believe that PetSmart’s position as a destination retailer and its services platform will continue to enable it to compete effectively against other online players.

Over the past year, I have been highlighting the risk of the internet to PetSmart.  I’ve not been alone in ringing this bell.  While I believe PetSmart is uniquely situated to perform well online long term, my concern has been that they have not had a coherent strategy. In light of recent financial performance, including 3Q13 guidance, I have to believe that other online players are succeeding at eroding some of the premium customer base of PetSmart’s and Petco, especially among a younger demographic.  The company’s willingness to detail their plan, after years of side stepping the question, tells me there is some truth to this theorem. While online will result in erosion of hardgoods share, because of the wide availability of these products online, the concern will not reach its apex unless and until pet specialty sees consumables share erosion to online.

Second, the long running narrative linking imported pet jerky story product to numerous pet deaths finally hit the headlines. News about pet death related to foreign jerky products have appeared in nearly every major online publication during the past week. My historical conversations with domestic manufacturers has been that regulatory bodies are not doing enough to protect consumers from imported product and instead have been myopically focused at cracking down on domestic producers.  While it is terrible that so many pets had to fall ill before we got to this point, it now seems we have arrive at the moment where the paradigm shifts. When the dust settles the winners will be consumers and branded treat companies with domestic sourcing and production pedigrees.

Third, Whole Foods announced that they are launching a house brand of premium value oriented pet products. Whole Paws will consist of 24 SKUs addressing both dogs and cats cutting across multiple categories ranging from grain-free food and treats to cat litter.  The attempts of traditional grocery to cut into pet specialty sales are, like the jerky story, old hat for those that follow the industry closely, but the within the natural segment pet remains an under monetized opportunity. Grocery continues to leak share to both mass and pet specialty, due to price and assortment respectively.  However, natural has a real market opportunity in my opinion because it can provide grocery consumers more of a one-stop-shop.  While space limitations will ultimately cap the potential of the natural channel within pet, this product line launch is a clear demonstration that store managers are starting to understand the potential of pets within their channel.  Natural could become a nice bed for incubation of emerging brands with a wellness oriented theme much the way it was in natural beverage, healthy snacks, and gluten free foods.

Finally, the relative pull of the pet industry on owners was again affirmed to me when I became aware that pet owners will purchase nearly $330 million of costumes for their pet this year. This amounts to approximate 22 million consumers spending, on average $15 annually.  What consumer pressures on pet?

/bryan

 

noseFor those of you who are consistent followers of my blog, you might recall earlier this year I was rather sanguine (on a relative basis) with respect to the prospects for the pet industry in 2013. My thesis was based upon three factors. First, that a tepid recovery would result in slower pet population growth and the waning of the pet food upgrade cycle. Second, that slowing comp (same-store-sales) growth at PetSmart was in fact a proxy for the industry. Finally, that declining influence of the baby boomers, who have slowed pet replacement, would not be sufficiently supplanted by the necessarily levels of spending growth by Gen X/Y to propel the industry forward at projected levels.

As we round the final turn in the calendar year and head for home, things have not played out quite as I had expected.  The industry has proven itself to again be resilient and more adaptable than even I recognized. The economic recovery has been aided by strong equity returns and rising home prices that have exceeded most pundits expectations. Notably, this has resulted in solid growth in industry related personal consumption expenditures that indicate the industry should deliver projected 2013 results. While PetSmart comps are in fact slowing, management has found ways to adapt — prolonging the pet food upgrade cycle through expanding offerings and more square footage dedicated to the premium aisle, resetting key categories such as canine hardgoods, and evolving service offerings to be more compelling.  Management also reported their belief that the company’s online strategy is producing above market returns. Finally, pet adoption rates, a key driver of spend, have accelerated in 1H2013 adding additional reason for optimism. While there may be clouds on the horizon, rain does not appear imminent. As such, we expect the industry to hit its annual growth projections.

In addition to strong growth, we are also predicting that 2013 be a good year for industry related transactions, both M&A and private placements. One of the best predictors of future M&A volume is trailing private placement volume. Generally speaking, private and growth equity firms have three to five year hold periods. From 2010 – 2012 private placement volume met or exceeded M&A volume in the pet industry. Investments made in 2010 are now starting to come into season. Given the number of companies that will enter their exit window over the next two years we expect transaction velocity to continue to grow. Consumables, distribution, and hardgoods are expected to lead the way. Based on 2013 private placement volume we expect this to become a long-term trend.

The year has also produced a number of trends that we expect will have long term implications. Among these, we are seeing acquisition rationales of large strategic acquirers focus on the value of acquired brands in the pet specialty channel. As an example, when Del Monte Foods acquired Natural Balance Pet Foods, it was the latest in a long line of wellness oriented pet properties snapped up by a large strategic acquirer. Historically, these acquired brands have migrated out of pet specialty and into mass where the market opportunity is perceived to be greater. Our understanding is that Del Monte intends to keep Natural Balance in its current channel. Sure we have heard this before from other buyers, but if you consider that mass is losing sales to pet specialty and currently there is a lack of large brands in independent pet specialty with traffic pull, we may be reaching the tipping point where taking share in broader pet specialty is the more attractive opportunity. Increasingly, we see large strategics seeking ways to connect with a premium consumer in pet specialty and believe that acquisition rationales will increasingly rely on this inherent logic.

Additionally, we are seeing a proliferation of direct-to-consumer models in the pet industry. While ecommerce is the most well known business model for direct sales to consumers, a number of alternative models (flash sales, curated retail, marketplace) have emerged post-recession. During the past twenty-four months, companies promoting these models have begun targeting the pet space.  Notably, Bark & Co. (curated retail), Dog Vacay (marketplace), and A Place for Rover (marketplace), have all raised significant amounts of capital. What these companies, and their backers, are betting on is that as Gen X/Y, demographics that have grown up transacting online, ascend in purchasing power these models will see increasing adoption.

As always, a more complete exploration of these topics and the broader industry are available in my report (post here or email me to request a copy).

/bryan