debt freeOne of the most frustrating aspects of following the pet industry is the lack of transparency we have into the operational results of bellwether companies that comprise the market.  With only a handful of pure-play public companies, and even fewer with meaningful analyst coverage, we are left to rely on publicly available market studies, which are often dated and/or at a cursory level, expensive third party research, or, more often than not, rumors and conjecture.  As evidence, approximately 25% of search terms that led people to this blog are related to market rumors (e.g. “Blue Buffalo acquired”) or data searches on private pet company performance (e.g. “Petco 2012 EBITDA”). However, the availability of cheap leverage to fund organic and acquired growth is providing us a rare opportunity to understand how some of these large private pet names are performing.

In October 2012, Moody’s Investor Services assigned a B3 rating (speculative) to a $250 million private bond issuance from Radio Systems Corporation, the privately held market leader in pet containment products and training systems.  The proceeds from the issuance went to replace existing balance sheet debt and purchase a putable equity stake valued at roughly $90 million.  According to Moody’s, the transaction would leave Radio Systems with a debt-to-EBITDA ratio of 4.7x.   The report also states that the company generated sales of $270 million for the twelve month period ended June 30, 2012.  So what can we glean from this disclosure?

  • Based on the company’s debt-to-EBITDA of 4.7x, this would imply Radio Systems had somewhere in the neighborhood of $50 million – $55 million in trailing EBITDA as of June 30, 2012.  Based on $270 million in sales for the coinciding period, this would imply an EBITDA margin of 18.5% – 20.0%, a good metric for a company of this size in this segment of the industry but certainly with room for expansion.
  • If we valued Radio Systems at an EBITDA multiple similar to the Sergeant’s Pet Care Products / Perrigo transaction or based on the public trading multiples of Garmin or Spectrum Brands, this would produce an implied enterprise value for Radio Systems of $500 – $550 million.
  • Finally, it appears safe to assume that TSG Consumer Partners, whose equity put is being acquired, will make a 3.0x return on its investment of $30 million made in 2006.  This returns Randy Boyd to full ownership of the company.

Moody’s rating of Blue Buffalo’s $470 million financing (rating B1) also provides us some salient insight into the company and its capital structure.  According to Moody’s, the proceeds of the transaction will go to fund a special dividend for the owners, including equity partner Invus Group.  While Moody’s did not peg a debt-to-EBITDA multiple for Blue Buffalo at the time of the transaction, it does state that “Moody’s expects that the company will be able to generate sufficient free cash flow to de-leverage rapidly, such that debt-to-EBITDA will be below five times in the next 12 months.”  The report also states that the company generated sales of $400 million for the twelve month period ended March 31, 2012.   So what can we glean from this disclosure?

  • If we assume the debt financing reflects the total leverage of Blue Buffalo, it is safe to assume that the company generated somewhere in the neighborhood of $80 – $90 million of EBITDA for the twelve month period ended March 31, 2012.  Based on $400 million in sales of the coinciding period, this would imply an EBITDA margin of 20.0% – 22.5%, a very good metric for a company of this size in this segment of the industry, especially one who is funding a national television advertising campaign.
  • Setting aside whether they were true or not, the rumors that were swirling around earlier this year that Blue Buffalo was entertaining sale dialogs with a starting price of $800 million, denotes an implied revenue multiple of 2.0x and an implied EBITDA multiple of +/- 10.0x, which do not appear out of line, maybe even light on the profitability side of the equation.
  • This confirms, what many people speculated, that Bill Bishop had sold a meaningful portion of the firm to a third party equity firm sometime within the last three years.  Invus, which has an evergreen fund structure, and therefore can hold positions for long periods, is a sensible partner.  Invus is also well credentialed in food, with historical investments in Keebler, Harry’s and Weight Watchers.

Finally, Petco Animal Supplies is again tapping the debt markets for $550 million in senior notes.  You might recall the company refinanced its balance sheet to the tune of $1.7 billion back in 2010, in part to finance a $700 million dividend to its owners, enabling them to repatriate 90% of their invested capital.  This time around, the notes along with balance sheet cash will be used to fund a $603 million distribution to shareholders.   I hashed out the Petco situation here before, but the most salient point that can be gleaned from Moody’s disclosure is that the company grew revenue from $3.0 billion to $3.3 billion from 2011 to 2012, a rate consistent with Petsmart for the same period, reflecting a greater equilibrium in the balance of power.

Net net, while much of the above might have been pieced together by an informed observer these conclusions were often difficult to corroborate because we lacked factual information.  One benefit of low interest rates, is we have gained some transparency in the process and therefore can substantiate some of the speculation rampant in the industry.

/bryan