April 2009


happy-puppehAgainst a backdrop of macroeconomic uncertainty, the pet industry continues to thrive.   While the prevailing theory that the industry is “recession proof” is being sternly tested, market fundamentals of pet ownership remain strong and consumers are skimping on themselves as opposed to their pets and/or children.  Further, the premium demographic continues to have a voracious appetite for efficacious products that are good for their pets as well as the environment.

That being said, the recession has set in motion a number of trends that will, in my view, forever change the pet industry landscape.  While several of these trends are in the “early innings” so to speak, the momentum behind them is significant.  The companies that stand to win during the next phase are those that recognize the seachange and position themselves to take advantage of the wave.  This period will separate the leaders from the pack, to steal a phrase.

Recession Not Found Here?

Pure play equities of pet related companies fell precipitously with the market during the second half of 2008.  However, unlike the general market, these equity began to experience their recovery in November 2008.   The primary driver of equity price contraction was based on fundamentals — earnings for these core names fell 30% from the prior quarter, which spooked the market (in truth some of this could be chalked up to seasonality).

In reality 3Q2008 was up year-over-year from an earning perspective, albeit only slightly.  In a world where flat is the new “up”, this should have been investors first signal that the market was overreacting in this category and  pet related equities were becoming oversold.  Notably, earnings rebounded strongly in 4Q2008 posting year-over-year growth of ~ 4% (weighted by market capitalization), driving a correction with respect to public company valuations.   Thus, the prospects for a technical recession in the pet industry are in fact quite low.

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Notably, the macro economic environment did not constrain equity deals in the pet space.  Key deals including Hammond Kennedy Whitney/FURminator, TSG Consumer Partners/Dogswell and Tyson/Freshpet were all announced against a declining or, even abysmal backdrop.   Appetite for pet related concepts has never been higher among growth equity funds due to the prevailing dynamics and long term fundamentals.

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Key Trends for 2009

So what are the seismic shifts of which I speak?

First, I believe we are in the early innings of a major shift in the pet retail landscape. PetSmart and Petco are facing significant competition from Wal Mart as they battle to be the one-stop-shop for the mid-tier pet buyer. Wal Mart’s merchandising acumen coupled with their reach and financial strength make them daunting opponents. Large pet specialty will take share among the most attractive demographic and thrive amidst the chaos among big box players. Their ability to educate buyers and offer patrons a favorable service experience situates them to be long term partners of both customers and the most compelling pet related brands. They will also take share from contracting boutiques hit be financial hardship.

Second, in bad times value trumps luxury.  The downturn in the U.S. economy has eroded the balance sheets of mainstream consumers. While companion animals will continue to a growing part of our society, consumers will become more fickle as it relates to spending on their pets. Product (excluding consumables) and service providers must give pet owners a compelling value proposition if they expect to experience continued growth. This change is expected to be lasting.

Third, consumers want to know what they are paying for.  In the food arena, efficacy is going to become important, a concept which many have taken at face value.  The market has become saturated with better-for-you pet food brands whose differentiation has become hard to appreciate. Supply chain control and organic are no longer differentiators. As distribution opportunities contract, due to contraction in the boutique market, and funding dries up, solutions that can demonstrate high degrees of efficacy will prevail. Customers will begin to demand results for their incremental dollar.

Finally, pet health will come in to focus as owners make difficult choices with their limited free cash flow.  Pet related health care is even more inefficient than its human corollary. Relations between veterinarians and their customers is strained by the high cost of service and medications and the limited proliferation of pet insurance. Further, compliance rates on even basic pet medications are sub-standard. Solutions will arrive that deliver compelling value throughout the pet health care supply chain, driving operating and cost savings at the clinic level, compliance rates among drug applications and ultimately satisfaction for pets and their owners.

Net net, I expect the balance of 2009 to be challenging but good for pet related industries.   Notably, I believe we will see additional pet related equity deals as investors seek to put capital to work in sectors that continue to grow.  As the debt market improves, leveraged buyouts of some of growing bell weathers of the industry (a la FURminator) begin to come in to play, assuming valuation expectations have come down due to market realities.   One would also expect public pet companies to seek to buy growth in a effort to fuel their lagging equity prices.  This could kick of a consolidation phase in the middle market, but I’m not overly optimistic.

As always, you can contact me for a complete version of our market presentation.

/bryan

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We Ask the Lenders—But Nobody Knows for Sure

broken-bankIt has long been our view that the economic recovery will begin when some liquidity returns to the lending markets. Businesses rely on the ability to borrow cost-effective capital to underwrite their daily operations, and debt is an essential cog in leveraged transactions; purchase price multiples rely on it.

With debt generally unavailable, the transaction and capital markets have dried up. On a micro-level, many companies we talk to are currently unable to pursue compelling opportunities because of a lack of credit that that would have been available a year ago. Other firms are facing tougher “survival mode” decisions in which cash is squeezed from any and every available source.

We don’t anticipate a rapid return to normalcy, but we are seeing signs that the market is making incremental gains.
High-yield issuance volume has remained robust; premium-quality second lien deals are starting to find interested buyers; the Federal Reserve’s intervention at the long end of the yield curve has diminished the opportunity for banks to buy loans on the secondary market at yields more attractive than those on new issuances; and The Toxic-Asset Relief Plan will also better position major lending institutions to recapitalize their balance sheets and begin new originations.

Unfortunately, these macro viewpoints are not much help to companies that need to make tactical decisions on how to fund their operations. In an effort to deliver better actionable information, Cascadia decided to go directly to the source and ask lenders what they’re up to, how the world has changed and, most importantly, when they think the market will improve.

As you might expect, some lenders were reluctant to make predictions or disclose information due to the fluctuating condition of the market and their business. Others were only willing to speak to us on an anonymous basis. Both of these factors are telling and, in our mind, do nothing to diminish the value of the content in the attached.

Read on for greater insight and—as always—let me know what you think.

/bryan

When Will It End?