cowboyIn prior posts I have lamented about the reality that the pet consumables industry lacks a deep pool of brand consolidators.  Once you get past the “big three” (Nestle Purina, Big Heart Brands (The J.M. Smucker Company), and Mars), the industry possess a limited set of buyers who operate brand portfolios and who have deep pockets to afford the most attractive properties at prevailing transaction multiples.  That is not to say there are no other capable buyers of pet consumables properties, but rather that the current valuation paradigms of the second tier of buyers represents a significant drop from that of market leaders, whom simply can do more strategically and operationally with the assets they acquire.

Conventional wisdom has been that, over time, this reality would work itself out in four ways. First, was that the largest Tier 2 players would become aggressive in their M&A push in an effort to challenge the market leaders. Save for Spectrum Brands, who has been active, acquiring Proctor & Gamble’s European division, which includes the Iams and Eukanuba brands, and Salix Animal Health, a leading pet treat manufacturer, this segment of buyers has been largely stagnant.  Hill’s Pet Nutrition has participated in a few known M&A processes, but never at valuation levels necessary to challenge the companies it is chasing. Second, was that large private players would become more aggressive in acquiring emerging brands before they became of interest to the large industry players, creating a second economy, so to speak, for sellers.  Save for WellPet’s acquisition of Sojos, activity within this class of competitors, at least for consumables companies, has been muted.  Generally speaking, these companies have either opted not to run brand portfolios, or chosen to build rather than buy.  The third leg of this stool was that foreign buyers would enter the market.  Save for Agrolimen SA’s joint venture with Nature’s Variety, we have only heard crickets from the foreign buyer community on notable deals. Finally, the notion was that human food companies would crossover into pet in an effort to capture the growth and margin available to leading industry players. While many have talked-the-talk, they have not been able to close, primarily losing out to industry players on a valuation basis due to operational synergies.

This fact pattern is troubling for many of the emerging authentic brands in the category, who don’t want to be perceived to be selling out a major industry player. For some, the thought of a foreign buyer or a consumer packaged goods or natural food company acquiring them remains seductive.  So why has the industry seen such limited crossover appeal to these constituencies?  The answer has both quantitative and qualitative underpinnings.

The pet industry possesses a myriad of large foreign operators in the consumables sub-segment.  According to petfoodindustry.com, three of the world’s 10 largest pet food players are foreign — Unicharm, Deuerer, and Heristo AG.  Additionally, there are five other foreign market players (mostly Western European) producing between $400 – $600 million in annual revenue. Based on the prevailing margin profile for a pet consumables business, these companies would seem to have sufficient financial wherewithal to acquire a mid-sized U.S. pet food business. However, when you analyze this population, the following common traits emerge — largely private companies with closely held/family ownership (Unicharm being the most notable exception), owned manufacturing assets, and a limited acquisition history.  Where these companies have been acquisitive the targets have been in the buyer’s home market or in direct geographic adjacency. While some of these acquisitions have been of reasonable size, $50 – $150 million, it is clear that most of these companies are most comfortable sticking to what they know or prospecting only as far geographically as required.  Further, when you talk to executives of these companies they tend to cite three primary concerns about U.S. pet consumables M&A — a) a lack of knowledge of the U.S. pet food market, b) a lack of internal M&A capability internally, c) a perception that the market is hyper competitive and therefore of limited attractiveness, and d) the deal prices are high in light of these competitive concerns.  It seems logical to conclude that these dynamics are only likely to change if, and when, these companies experience a slowdown in their core business, if ever, and/or a professionalization movement stimulated by private equity drives them towards these outcomes.  Of note, some of the smartest U.S. private equity funds with a heritage in pet consumables are actively targeting Western Europe for their next pet deal, but I view the possibility of these parties being players for U.S. assets as being a ways off.

Consumer packaged goods companies, as potential buyers of pet businesses have had their own unique limitations.  Most notably, is the challenge these players have had with appreciating the gross margin profiles of the targets.  Companies like Clorox and Church & Dwight, who have actively courted pet companies involved in sale processes, are used to product level gross margins that push 50%.  We have yet to see a lower middle market pet food company that could produce those types of margins.  Scale operators like Blue Buffalo generate 40% gross margins.  Further, this class of buyers is not used to employing meat based inputs and concerns about recalls have led them to prioritize companies with owned production assets, which as a class of sellers have been experiencing the highest market valuation multiples in the most recent M&A cycle.  Finally, we find consumer product companies, who are used to spending considerable dollars on consumer marketing, do not appreciate the role the pet specialty retailer plays in motivating product sales, and therefore they build into their valuation models a level of additional spend that makes them less competitive on price. Absent a notable cross-over success story, we don’t foresee these sentiments changing. In fact we have seen more companies in this class give up the ghost than take us the charge.

Finally, we have the conundrum of the natural food companies.  It would seem logical to assume this class of companies would be interested in the pet space given the current parallels between the human and animal nutrition markets.  With the proliferation of grain-free and natural pet solutions, these two markets have never been more closely aligned.  There have been several instances where natural food businesses have pursued pet food assets where they appeared poised to win, only to go home empty handed. The challenges here have been both quantitative and qualitative.  On the quantitative side, the inability to drive revenue synergies has made them less price competitive, even though deals at prevailing levels for the most attractive properties would have been accretive on an earnings basis (as an example Hain Celestial trades at 16.5x LTM EBITDA). Further, this class of buyers needs a scale property to justify the adjacent market entry to their investor base, which leaves them both limited properties to choose from and puts them in direct competition with the big three.  On the qualitative side, two issues have surfaced consistently.  First, these companies are being actively pursued by large strategic buyers themselves, which means focus is critical to driving shareholder value and remaining independent if that is what is perceived to be in the best interest of shareholders. Second, is the intellectual conundrum of adding meat to the portfolio mix.  Of note, the three largest natural food products companies — General Mills, WhiteWave Foods, and Hain Celestial — orient their market offerings around plant based nutrition.  Adding meat into that marketing narrative makes for a bit of a conundrum, even if they are comfortable with the food handling risk.  My view is the right property will enable these buyers to overcome those concerns.  The attractiveness of the profit margin profile of well managed animal protein based businesses, nearly 2x on an EBITDA margin basis at scale, will be sufficient to motivate a natural products buyer with some vision. I view it as only a matter of time before one of these companies takes this leap of faith, but there is certainly no clarity on when that might happen.  WhiteWave Foods and Boulder Brands, the two natural products companies who have come closest to the finish line now find themselves in very different circumstances.

While the above narrative may lead one to conclude the glass is half empty, as opposed to half full, it is actually an improvement on the historical paradigm. Five years ago we would not be mentioning the other classes of buyers as possibilities, let alone probabilities.  Today, I see it more as a matter of when, not if.

/bryan

Note: This blog is for informational purposes only. The opinions expressed reflect my view as of the publishing date, which are subject to change.  While this post utilizes data sources I consider reliable, I cannot guarantee the accuracy of any third party cited herein.

 

 

 

 

mockingjayEarlier this month, Petco Animal Supplies and PetSmart stores in Topeka, Kansas, and adjacent Lawrence, Kansas, removed from their shelves Hill’s Science Diet and Ideal Balance products.  Store managers have been telling customers that the brands is not coming back on shelf.  Notably, Hill’s Pet Nutrition, a subsidiary of Colgate Palmolive, is headquartered in Topeka.

Consider the above action a shot across the bow in the dynamically evolving landscape of pet food retail.  To better understand the future, and what this gambit might mean, one must begin with a look at the past.

Hill’s Pet Nutrition was founded in 1907. The company started in the rendering business.  By 1930, the company had evolved into packing company, producing animal feed, dog food, and horsemeat for human consumption in Norway, Finland, and Sweden.  In 1948, Dr. Mark Morris contacted Hill’s seeking a producer for Canine k/d, his brand of healthy scientifically engineered pet food.  In 1968, Canine k/d was made available to veterinarians as Hill’s Science Diet.  The brand evolved into a broad line of prescription and breed specific solutions available through veterinarians and pet specialty retailers.  In 1978, Hill’s became part of the Colgate family through a merger of Hill’s parent company.  In 1999, Hill’s sales reached $1 billion.

What is particularly significant was the fact that Hill’s was at the forefront of the healthy pet food revolution, albeit with a scientific approach. Further, long before there was Blue Buffalo, Hill’s, along with Nutro, was one of the biggest drivers of customer traffic to pet specialty retailers on the market.  Thus, for Petco and PetSmart to declare war on Hill’s is, for lack of a better term, A BIG DEAL.

The makings of this feud can be traced back five years.  Beginning in 2011, Hill’s pet food sales began to stagnate.  The company, whose products evoked images of white lab coats and engineers, found itself on the wrong side of a change in consumer preference, and therefore purchase intent.  Instead of favoring science based nutrition solutions, pet owners began to favor products whose ingredient panels best mirrored their own diet.  White lab coats were replaced by images of roasted turkey, market vegetables, and whole grains.  Natural triumphed over engineered.

Hill’s, being part of a large consumer packaged goods firm, was not content to let its franchise slip away. The company tried to change with the market, launching Science Diet Nature’s Best, a naming convention approaching the absurd.  Not surprisingly the disconnect remained.  Hill’s responded with the launch of Ideal Balance, its “natural” solution, but was slow to win back customers. While Hill’s revenues had grown to $2.2 billion in 2015, this number represented essentially flat growth between 2011 – 2015.  To maintain sales, Hill’s embraced the internet as a channel.  In 2015, Hill’s represented 7.5% of online pet food sales, taking the third position behind Blue Buffalo (12.3%) and Wellness (9.0%).  It attained that position by turning a blind eye to the price discount pet food retailers where charging for its solution set, thereby drawing the ire of Petco and PetSmart.  And you understand why we-are-where-we-are.

One has to surmise that Hill’s knows quite well what it is doing and the consequences of its actions. My understanding is they have recently put pressure on major online retail sites to enforce their MAP policy based, in turn, on pressure from Petco and PetSmart. However, if Hill’s cannot get back in the good graces of its top premise based retailers, prepare to find Science Diet and Ideal Balance at big box store near you.  The likes of Target and Wal Mart would welcome Hill’s and its customer base with open arms. Whether this is a brilliant move by Colgate or the straw that breaks the brands back remains to be seen.

Of greater interest is what this means for Blue Buffalo.  A big box Hill’s is not going to be a welcome site for the veterinary community who drives the disproportionate sales of prescription diets and is a big influencer of Science Diet sales.  Blue Buffalo has staked the next leg of its growth stool on its veterinary line of products.  If Hill’s defects, that will create a fracture in the relationship between the company and the veterinary community that Blue Buffalo could be poised to exploit.  That’s not to say it won’t have fierce competition for that mind share from the likes of Royal Canin and Purina, but thirty days ago that market looked much tougher to crack.

Let the games begin.

/bryan

Note: This blog is for informational purposes only. The opinions expressed reflect my view as of the publishing date, which are subject to change.  While this post utilizes data sources I consider reliable, I cannot guarantee the accuracy of any third party cited herein.

 

 

 

phoenisThe pet industry stands at the precipice of a tactical sea change.  The industry entered into this transitional phase in 2014 and is expected to remain there through 2017.  The industry entered into this state as a result of slowing growth and macroeconomic headwinds.  The historical catalysts for growth — Baby Boomers as the driver of industry spend, pet food upgrade cycle, premise based retail — have waned.  However, the future change drivers — pet ownership among Millennials, grain-free and alternative form factor pet food, ecommerce, connected pet — are individually not yet sufficient to resurface the landscape. Yet we expect, after another year of gestation, these trends, will set of the next phase of industry growth, market share shift, and strategic acquisitions.

As we muddle through the tail end of this transitional phased, here are trends we are keeping an eye on in 2016:

  • Industry Offers More Upside Opportunity than Downside Risk. Despite the slowing sequential growth rate for the industry and the limited innovation in consumables, we believe the industry stands poised to outperform in 2016. Our premise relies on three factors. First, the acceleration in pet adoptions experienced in the 2H2015 will have a knock-on effect on pet spending in 2016 as these new owners generate a full year of expenditures and trade up to premium solutions. This adoption spike is consistent with the 2012 – 2013 period where growth was 4.5%, albeit from a smaller base. Second, while the pet food upgrade cycle may be running on fumes, a proliferation in food additives, convenience offerings, and premium cat solutions will provide the industry with a growth impetus. Finally, we view the macro economic stability for employment, wage growth, and consumer sentiment as remaining favorable through the balance of 2016.
  • Expect Transaction Velocity to Remain High. 2015 was a return to normalized transaction velocity levels for the industry after a two year hiatus. We expect transaction velocity will remain high in 2016 as consolidation themes continue and sellers try to take advantage of the tail end of the capital markets cycle. What will change is the types of deals that are getting done. In 2014 and 2015, the industry was the subject of a large number of headline grabbing transactions involving key industry names – Big Heart Brands, PetSmart, Petco, MWI Veterinary Supply.  Absent a sale of Champion Petfoods, we expect most of the velocity to be among companies valued at less than $250 million. Notably, the M&A rumor mill was at peak decibel levels at Global Pet Expo. However, the number of companies pursuing deals pursuant to organized processes appears lower, meaning the number of potential deals that could get done pursuant to one-off dialogs is elevated.
  • Consumables Lines Blurring in New Ways. Five years ago, the thought of a pet treat business being able to bridge into pet food was unthinkable. Today there exist a myriad of treat brands which have developed a trusted connection with consumers in the pet specialty channel that might allow them to make that leap. Notably, several of these brands launched food solutions at Global Pet Expo to very favorable retailer response. While it is unclear if and how quickly these solutions can scale, it speaks to the fact that the delineation between food and treat brands continues to decrease.  As premium pet food companies find market share gains harder to come by, we expect they will seek to expand sales volume through increased treat offerings and acquisitions of treat companies. Further, treat company valuations will benefit from buyers factoring in potential product line extensions into food, though not all brands will benefit.
  • Ecommerce Landscape Changes Ahead. Sales of pet products continues to grow online fueled by price based competition and increased convenience. The impact of growing online sales can been seen acutely in the comps of Petco and PetSmart prior to their representative transactions. However, the pain has spread to the independent channel as well, as more brands have embraced ecommerce as a driver of growth and customer acquisition. In response, retailers are putting pressure on manufacturers to enforce MAP policies or, in some cases, choose sides. However, many of the brands caught in the battle among retail formats are not well equipped to do either. Assuming that Chewy.com continues to find fuel for its growth, and that Jet.com continues to find brands willing to embrace its platform, this problem will grow. Pressuring brands will not solve the problem. Rather, the winners in retail will be those who deliver the best consumer service experience as measured by selection, price, and convenience. Independent retailers will need to develop capabilities that enable their customers to shop online and get accelerated delivery, presenting an opportunity for distributors to fill this void.

 

As always, a complete copy of our 2016 industry report is available by email.

/bryan

Note: This blog is for informational purposes only. The opinions expressed reflect my view as of the publishing date, which are subject to change.  While this post utilizes data sources I consider reliable, I cannot guarantee the accuracy of any third party cited herein.

 

dwarfEarlier this week it was announced that Mars Petcare had acquired Whistle Labs, designer and marketer of activity monitoring and asset tracking solutions for small companion animals.  The deal was valued at $117 million (or $119 million depending on the source of information).  Whistle had raised $25 million in outside capital, including $21 million in two institutional rounds, including a $15 million Series B round in January 2015, led by Nokia Growth Partners.  The Series B also including participation from, among others,  Melo7 Tech Ventures (the equity fund of Carmelo Anthony, NBA superstar) and QueensBridge Venture Partner (the equity fund of Nasir Jones, world famous rapper).  The post-money on the Series B was reported to be $26.65 million, meaning these investors made a ~ 4.5x cash-on-cash return on the sale and triple digit internal rate of return based on the short duration.

When Whistle launched its solution set the market was bifurcated between activity monitoring and asset tracking.  The asset tracking side was being addressed largely by companies that were re-purposing technology that had been deployed in more traditional markets, such as logistics, automobile tracking, or human tracking (yes these do exist).  However, these companies did not necessarily recognize the emotional engagement aspects of the pet space, and did little to build community.  The network costs of these businesses were high, and the user base was small.  Given that the initial hardware purchase was subsidized, these businesses lost money, sometimes large amounts of it.  Further, there was no effective retail channel for this class of products as the major pet specialty retailers were not well situated to sell a $200 device with a monthly subscription attached thereto or explain the value proposition effectively to customers, and therefore the market was slow to emerge. Traditional channels, such as consumer electronics and mobile phone centers, were no more effective at attracting pet owners let alone articulating the purchase rationale.  It did not help that most of these solutions had large form factors and minimal visual appeal.

In contrast, Whistle brought to market an activity tracker with a high level of aesthetic appeal at a much lower cost.  Of significance, gone were the monthly subscriptions.  The problem was the market wanted asset tracking as the linkage between the activity monitor and the benefits use case was just not obvious to pet owners.  In short, there was data but not much to do with it and sharing it was cumbersome.  Much like the early human activity tracking sector, the real value of these devices did not emerge until the ecosystem and community aspect developed. Whistle would use part of its Series B financing to acquire Snaptracs, the Qualcomm based asset tracking solution that it spun out in 2013.  Using their industrial engineering acumen, Whistle combined the two solution sets into a best of breed offering and the business began to accelerate.

About the time of the Series B, Whistle began collaborating with Mars on the use cases of its device.  The challenge became how do you balance the venture capitalists agenda — drive brand, drive sales, drive community — with the Mars agenda around linking the data to wellness outcomes and product sales.  In the end, we believe Mars acquired Whistle to enable its agenda to become central to the future of the business.  Given that the lifetime value of a subscriber was high as the revenue was recurring, shareholder value increased exponentially.

While the acquisition and the prevailing purchase price will certainly give momentum to the connected pet space, the perceived rationale is somewhat vexing to rationalize.  Connected pet solutions that have been funded and launched into the market over the past few years have focused more on emotive connections (remote viewing, remote treating, automated feeding) than wellness outcomes, and here we have an acquisition rationale that we believe is tied more to healthcare outcomes than humanization. That is not to say the deal won’t be effective in catalyzing more investment and further M&A; the return profile will ensure that happens.

This deal very much validates the space, and we have been on record suggesting more large consolidators get into connected pet since 2013, when we marketed the Snaptracs business for sale.  We believe other large players will have to take notice and find avenues to take a position in connected pet. Further, we think the Mars acquisition rationale is specific to them and does not require a pivot by other operators to enhance their focus on wellness.  Mars is unique in that it is the only enterprise that has both veterinary hospitals and branded companion animal consumables, and therefore could view Whistle in a unique way and justify the purchase price as a result. It does help that they are a very large private enterprise and do not have to kowtow to outside shareholders.

One of the key themes we witnessed at the most recent Global Pet Expo was a proliferation of solutions aimed at connecting owners to their pets wherever they were resident at the time — the home, the grooming salon, the daycare or dog walker, the boarding facility. etc.  Expect the Whistle deal to give them all more conviction and attract a host of new entrants seeking to capitalize on the market opportunity. Ultimately, pet owners stand to benefit most.

/bryan

Note: This blog is for informational purposes only. The opinions expressed reflect my view as of the publishing date, which are subject to change.  While this post utilizes data sources I consider reliable, I cannot guarantee the accuracy of any third party cited herein.

 

 

petcoWhen Petco Animal Supplies agreed to be acquired by CVC Capital Partners and the Canada Pension Plan Investment Board for $4.6 billion, the Dow Jones Industrial Average was trading around 17,800.  The market had recovered from the August swoon that turned out to be the worst month for the index in five years. Concerns about a slowdown in China, falling oil prices, and possible rate hikes by the Federal Reserve, sent the index into a tailspin.  Now, a mere 90 days removed from that correction, the Dow stood within three percent of its 2015 high water mark, and little concern was expressed about mega-deals, such as the Petco transaction, getting to close.  Press releases for the deal indicated a closing would happen in 1Q2016.

When the deal was announced, it was also disclosed that the transaction would be supported by $3 billion in acquisition financing, underwritten by Barclays, Citigroup, Royal Bank of Canada, Credit Suisse, Nomura, and Macquarie.  The broad lender support was a function of the company’s strong credit profile and a favorable following with investors after multiple recapitalizations, which is reflected in its trading profile in the secondary loan market.  Further, PetSmart’s acquisition debt had been trading a favorable rates in the secondary market, boosting interest. However, the deal was subject to syndication that would happen in 1Q2016.  While there has been no indication with any issues in closing the deal, there is cause for concern.  When the debt package was originally negotiated, the credits market were choppy,  now they are downright turbulent with bankruptcies accelerating and junk bond issuances declining by over 70% year-over-year.  While these bankruptcies are primarily related to the energy markets and energy dependent segments, they have put a malaise into the large cap buyout credit market as a whole.  Notably, in January, Citigroup tweaked the terms of Petco’s loan package to make it more attractive to potential syndication partners.

I proffer an example of the credit market’s uneasiness in the case of Mills Fleet Farm Group. In 2015, KKR agreed to buy the family owned retailer of rural consumer goods, including pet products, for $1.2 billion. Mills Fleet operates 35 stores in Minnesota, Wisconsin, Iowa and North Dakota.  The deal was set to close in late 2015, before it ran into trouble with its debt package. No sell-side capital markets deck was willing to take the paper, and KKR was forced to sell finance a large portion of the debt package against a backdrop of large retailer earnings misses, which drove up pricing.  The sale of Mills Fleet closed on Leap Day 2016, fitting.

While we may not be able to draw a direct correlation between Mills Fleet and Petco, the deals fall into the same buyout class.  Further, if you look outside of these transactions not many large cap LBOs are closing.  Most of the recent multi-billion deals have involved strategic acquirors.  Ultimately, we expect the Petco transaction to close, but there may be more bumps in the road along the way.

/bryan

Note: This blog is for informational purposes only. The opinions expressed reflect my view as of the publishing date, which are subject to change.  While this post utilizes data sources I consider reliable, I cannot guarantee the accuracy of any third party cited herein.

 

 

beakersHistorically, the discourse around pet food delivered in alternative form factors (fresh/frozen, freeze-dried, dehydrated) has focused on the merits, or lack thereof, associated with feeding your pet raw protein. Lost behind the countless articles delving into the pros and cons of raw, has been the growth in both size and importance of this sub-category, and the value it has created for those who invested early in this category.

According to GfK point-of-sale data from the pet specialty channel for the 12 months ended August 2015, alternative form factor pet food was, in approximate terms, a $175 million market.  Based on these same figures for the prior year period, this represents 50%+ growth for the category.  When you add to this annualized IRI MULO data for fresh/frozen pet food sold in the mass market and apply an adjustment to GfK’s estimate of dehydrated pet food, which we know to be low, and the total market is approaching $750 million, growing at 30% – 35%.  While relative to dry kibble, this market is in fact small, it is meaningful, and in combination with its growth rate, cannot be ignored by the large strategic buyers in the space.

Validation of this notion began to accelerate in 2H2014 when Agrolimen SA, a Spanish privately-held producer of food and other consumer goods, quietly acquired a controlling stake in Nature’s Variety, the market leader in freeze-dried raw pet food, from Catterton Partners.  This was followed closely by the successful initial public offering by Freshpet, Inc. (NASDAQ: FPRT), which currently trades at 2.3x Revenue despite some challenges in the roll-out of their refrigerator program among several large retail accounts.

After a brief fallow period, further validation arrived in the form of Nestle SA’s acquisition of Merrick Pet Care. While Merrick’s market entry into the freeze dried raw space (Backcountry), was nascent, the fact that they had an in-market offering was clearly a benefit to the deal.  Around this same period, Stella & Chewy’s, LLC, a portfolio company of Stripes Group,  and the market leader in freeze-dried raw sold in the independent pet store channel, transitioned into a new 164,000 square-foot facility in Oak Creek, Wisconsin, funded by a debt package sourced by the company in early 2015.  On January 7, 2016, the company announced it had hired a highly seasoned consumer industry executive to run the company and recruited pet industry executive Mark Sapir as Chief Marketing Officer.  Sapir most recently served as VP of Marketing & Innovation at Merrick.  Finally, on January 8, 2016, it was disclosed that WellPet, LLC, a portfolio company of Berwind Corporation, and the owners of the Old Mother Hubbard (which had been previously owned by Catterton) and Eagle Pack Brands, had acquires Sojourner Farms, LLC, doing business as Sojos. Sojos is number two or three player in the dehydrated pet food space.  In addition to providing validation of both the freeze-dried raw and dehydrated solution set, it also provides further evidence that larger players in the consumables space will buy smaller brands, especially if those brands resonate with premium customers who shop independent pet specialty.

So what does this all mean? I believe there are two conclusions that can be drawn. First, that the alternative form factor pet food market is a real sub-category and mid-sized to large players need to pay attention to it, because consumers are buying into the category, and have a response for how to compete within it or counter its proliferation going forward. The category is no longer a novelty, something that market leaders can simply write off or ignore.  Second, it’s going to result in more transactions as strategics buy into the space in an effort to deliver a competitive response. The winners of this coming-of-age will be the entrepreneurs who pioneered the category and the private/growth equity firms that supported them.  With a limited set of properties available, it could send valuations, which have been trending down, back towards the upper end of the historical multiple range.

/bryan

Note: This blog is for informational purposes only. The opinions expressed reflect my view as of the publishing date, which are subject to change.  While this post utilizes data sources I consider reliable, I cannot guarantee the accuracy of any third party cited herein.

 

 

 

 

 

petcoOn November 23rd, CVC Capital Partners Limited and Canada Pension Plan Investment Board (the “Buyout Group”) signed a definitive agreement to acquire PETCO Animal Supplies, Inc. (“Petco”) from TPG Capital, L.P., Leonard Green & Partners, L.P., and friends for $4.6 billion. The deal values Petco at approximately 10.0x my pro-forma TTM Adjusted EBITDA for Petco as of October 31, 2015. This contrasts with the 9.0x TTM Adjusted EBITDA for the acquisition of PetSmart by BC Partners.  It is rumored that the Buyout Group was able to arrange approximately $3 billion of debt financing to support the deal.  Notably, both Petco and PetSmart will be owned by foreign investors assuming the deal closes.

It should come as no surprise that Petco opted for a private equity sale. Too much time had passed since the September 18th media leaks to believe a Petco / PetSmart combination would come together.  The case for public equity offering also faced numerous headwinds — a) broader stock market volatility driven by macro-political risk (Syria, ISIS, China), b) weaker than anticipated earnings among publicly traded retailers (as of November 20th over 40% of the retailers in the S&P 500 had posted earnings misses for 3Q2015), c) weak October retail sales (0.1% increase versus 0.3% consensus) and d) falling consumer confidence (lowest levels this year and a steep drop from October).  Against this backdrop, a trade sale was the most attractive option, even if debt market support for the deal had been choppy.  We generally consider 10.0X the break-point for specialty retailer M&A, above which history has not looked kindly on the buyer from a shareholder value creation standpoint.

The most pressing question now is who will lead the acquired organization going forward.  Jim Meyers, who has been in the CEO role since March 2004 (he was named Chairman earlier this year), and his team has lead Pecto back to a position of prominence.  Based on the S-1, Petco was posting stronger growth and better unit economics than its larger rival.  However, if history is a guide, large private equity deals seldom result in a staying of the course. In a small amount of irony, it is possible, though unlikely, that David Lenhardt could be running Petco a year after being ousted from PetSmart. Stranger things have happened.

If the Buyout Group is smart, they will purse incremental changes at Petco as opposed to a holistic approach to transformation. While there are certainly cost inefficiencies to be rung out of the system, Petco’s value is in how well it is currently situated from a growth standpoint with its greater emphasis on wellness, its multi-box positioning, its omnichannel reach and its under penetration in private label.  Further, with PetSmart deeply invested in its cost containment program, now is the time for Petco to press on the growth accelerator.  Someone is going to grab the brass ring and if not Petco, the chase will be led by Pet Supplies Plus, Pet Valu or a series of financially supported independent chains.

The next year should be an interesting one is large box pet retail land.  Regrettably we won’t be getting much transparency into either business any time soon.

/bryan

Note: This blog is for informational purposes only. The opinions expressed reflect my view as of the publishing date, which are subject to change.  While this post utilizes data sources I consider reliable, I cannot guarantee the accuracy of any third party cited herein.

 

 

 

 

 

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